HOME-ARP

Help Create a New Local Homelessness Plan

From March 14-18, Evansville’s Department of Metropolitan Development will host a public conference to update our community’s 10-year plan to end homelessness. During the week, we’ll be gathering insight from Evansville residents and local nonprofit agencies to create a new 2022 homelessness plan, while also helping our community access greatly needed housing funding by meeting the requirements of the American Rescue Plan.

It’s important to have your participation! Please join us for all or any part of this week-long event by either Zoom or in person. Sessions will be held daily from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (CDT) at the C.K. Newsome Center, Room 118, located at 100 E. Walnut Street in downtown Evansville.

Or participate via Zoom here daily: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83578946208?pwd=RVdhMUdYdSszUVFVeDkvYUd5V1VnZz09

Meeting Name: HOME ARP Event

Meeting ID: 835 7894 6208
Passcode: 903533

Add it to your calendar here: https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/tZcocOGhqj0oGtyoIbzfXDd5g-bW0wwy9_A4/ics?icsToken=98tyKuGrqzwiE9CTshmPRpwqGY_CWfPwiCFBjbdEkzbnGSZrRgejMa9ABeJoB8GJ

Conference Topics

The first half of each day—from 11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.—will feature an open discussion, led by Naila Carnagua, around the topics of our 2012 plan to end homelessness:

  • Access to permanent housing
  • Coordinated access and prevention
  • Healthcare
  • Homeless children and youth
  • Performance measures
  • Re-entry

(If participating via Zoom, please use the chat feature to ask your questions.)

The second half of each day—from 1:30-3:30 p.m.—will feature an intensive planning discussion, led by Prosperity Indiana, around these new topics:

  • Racial equity
  • Vulnerable populations (qualifying populations of HOME-ARP)
  • Landlord relations
  • Special requirements of HOME-ARP

These afternoon planning sessions will include a panel of subject matter experts, followed by audience discussions. (If participating via Zoom, please use the chat feature to ask your questions.)


Daily Conference Schedule

MONDAY, March 14, 2022
(This starts the 30-day public comment period, as required)
11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Previous Plans to End Homelessness (Open Discussion)

  • 11:00-12:00 — History and goals
  • 12:00-1:00 — Access to permanent housing
  • 1:00-1:30 — BREAK / chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

1:30-3:30 p.m. — Racial Equity Intensive Planning

  • 1:30-2:30 — Expert Panel Discussion
  • 2:30-3:30 — Audience Discussion
  • 3:30-4:00 — Chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

TUESDAY, March 15, 2022
11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Previous Plans to End Homelessness (Open Discussion)

  • 11:00-12:00 — Prevention
  • 12:00-1:00 — Homeless children and youth
  • 1:00-1:30 — BREAK (Closing Feedback to Consultants)

1:30-3:30 p.m. — Vulnerable Populations Intensive Planning (Qualifying Populations)

  • 1:30-2:30 — Expert panel discussion
  • 2:30-3:30 — Audience discussion
  • 3:30-4:00 — Chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2022
11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Previous Plans to End Homelessness (Open Discussion)

  • 11:00-12:00 — Healthcare
  • 12:00-1:00 — Re-entry

1:30-3:30 p.m. — Landlord Relations Intensive Planning

  • 1:30-2:30 — Expert panel discussion
  • 2:30-3:30 — Audience discussion
  • 3:30-4:00 — Chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

THURSDAY, March 17, 2022
11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Previous Plans to End Homelessness (Open Discussion)

  • 11:00-12:00 — Performance measures
  • 12:00-1:00 — Coordinated access (entry)
  • 1-1:30 — BREAK / chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

1:30-3:30 p.m. — Special Requirements of HOME-ARP Intensive Planning (Affordable Housing, Coordinated Entry, Fair Housing, Continuum of Care, etc.)

  • 1:30-2:30 — Expert panel discussion
  • 2:30-3:30 — Audience discussion
  • 3:30-4:00 — Chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

FRIDAY, March 18, 2022
11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. — Homeless Data Updates & Market Studies Presentation (Open Discussion)

  • 11:00-12:00 — Presentation
  • 12:00-1:00 — Audience discussion
  • 1:00-1:30 — BREAK / chance to provide closing feedback to consultant

1:30-3:30 p.m. — Closing Discussion

  • 1:30-2:30 — Expert panel discussion
  • 2:30-3:30 — Audience discussion
  • 3:30-4:00 — Chance to provide closing feedback to consultants

3:30 p.m. — HOME-ARP Public Meeting


New 2022 Topics Overview

Racial equity: In the 2019 Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR), African Americans have remained considerably overrepresented among the homeless population compared to the U.S. population. African Americans accounted for 40% of all people experiencing homelessness in 2019 and 52% of people experiencing homelessness as members of families with children, despite being 13% of the U.S. population. HUD recognizes the need for communities to better understand and address the overrepresentation of people of color among those experiencing homelessness.

Vulnerable Populations (qualifying populations): HOME-American Rescue Plan defines qualifying individuals or families as those who are:

  1. Homeless, as defined in section 103(a) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 11302(a)) (“McKinney-Vento”)
  2. At risk of homelessness, as defined in section 401 of McKinney-Vento
  3. Fleeing, or attempting to flee domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or human trafficking
  4. Part of other populations where providing supportive services or assistance would prevent a family’s homelessness or would serve those with the greatest risk of housing instability
  5. Veterans and families that include a veteran family member who meets the criteria in one of 1-4 above

Landlord Relations:  HUD recognizes that one of the primary challenges homeless people face is navigating the housing market. Most communities have a shortage of housing affordable to low-income households. As a result, landlords can afford to use strict screening criteria, and there is little incentive to work with individuals and families that have low incomes, credit problems, criminal histories, and/or unstable housing histories.

HOME-ARP Production Housing Goals:  The HOME-ARP allocation plan must estimate the number of affordable rental housing units for qualifying populations that a PJ will produce or support with its HOME-ARP allocation.

Coordinated Entry and Project-Specific  Waitlists:  On a project-by-project basis, we must use the method of  tenant selection prescribed by HUD to select qualifying households for occupancy of permanent affordable housing.  We may use the coordinated entry or coordinated entry process of a continuum of care (CoC) for referrals for projects and activities.

Continuum of Care (CoC): We are part of the Indiana Balance of State CoC that includes 91 (except Marion) out of 92 counties. Marion County is part of the Indianapolis CoC.

Consultation: At a minimum, we must consult with the CoC serving the jurisdiction’s geographic area, homeless  and domestic violence service providers, veterans groups, public housing agencies, public agencies that address the needs of the qualifying populations, and public or private organizations that address fair housing, civil rights, and the needs of persons with disabilities.